Did you know?

Capitol Hill is the unofficial birthplace of Denver's preservation movement. Following the 1970s demolition of the Moffat Mansion (at 8th and Grant) Historic Denver, Inc. was created by concerned citizens in time to save another of our city's precious historic homes, that of the "unsinkable" Margaret Brown.

Resources

 

Financial Incentives
Click HERE to view information on Colorado State Rehabilitation Tax Credits, which covers 20% of qualified rehabilitation expenses for properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Colorado State Register, or designated by a Certified Local Government, such as Denver and Federal Historic Preservation Income Tax Credits, which are for income-producing properties, such as commercial or rental residential buildings. This link also provides information on the Federal Historic Preservation Tax credit as well as grants from the Colorado State Historical Fund.


Pattern and Design Idea Books
Historic Denver has created three Pattern and Design Idea Books to provide inspiration to homeowners that reside in neighborhoods that characterize a particular period from our history, but are in areas that are gaining popularity and are experiencing development pressure.  Both minor remodels, which don't alter the exterior of the home, and major remodels, which increase the square footage of the home, are presented.  Click HERE to view the Pattern and Design Idea Books for Pre-WWII Homes in Arvada, Post-WWII Homes in Arvada, and Post-WWII Homes in Aberdeen Village, Littleton.


Homeowner Education Workshops

Historic Denver has produced a series of videos to capture information presented in four homeowner education workshops. Click the links below to view the videos or slideshows.
Historic Preservation Basics and Tax Credits
Window Restoration and Weatherization
- Mortar and Wood Trim Restoration
Energy Efficiency for the Older Home


Technical Preservation Briefs from the National Park Service
Usually historic or older buildings require a different, more thoughtful approach for renovation. Though their materials are generally of better quality, careful planning is still needed to ensure that such buildings’ systems and assemblies are not compromised. For example, the mortar used in older masonry homes is “softer” than the concrete-based mortar commonly used today. If the mortar joints are re-pointed with a “harder” mortar, extensive damage to the bricks can occur over time.  The National Park Service’s Technical Preservation Services program offers online Preservation Briefs, in-depth essays which cover a wide range of technical topics related to restoration, from masonry to windows to interior painting. Get an informal preservation education by checking out the Preservation Briefs at the NPS/TPS website HERE.


Historic Denver’s Preservation Hotline

If you feel intimidated by the technical side of restoration and have a question about your house or upcoming project, you can take advantage of our Preservation Hotline by calling 303.534.5288 ext. 6 to get general advice and pointers.


Contractor Resource List
For Supporters of Historic Denver, we provide our comprehensive referral list of qualified and preservation-minded contractors, trade and craftspeople for all of your historic home’s repair, maintenance and renovation projects. Our list was recently updated and is readily available as a pdf or in hard copy. If you are currently a supporter, please call (303) 534-5288 ext. 6, or email bdierschow@historicdenver.org for your copy of the list. Not a Supporter? Become one today to gain access to this valuable resource! If you are a contractor and would like to be added to the list, please click HERE.


An Owner's Manual for Historically Designated Homes &Buildings
In 2010, in partnership with the City of Denver and the Colorado State Historical Fund, Historic Denver published a new brochure to explain the ins and outs of landmark designation, design review and tax credits.  Read it in detail HERE.

Landmark Designation Frequently Asked Questions
Historic designation is one method of ensuring that changes to a neighborhood occur thoughtfully, preserving the fabric of a neighborhood that people love — homes with history, vital dwellings that preserve the past — while acknowledging modern lifestyles. Navigating the ins and outs of the designation process and what it means for your property, however, can be a difficult task. We've created a Historic Designation FAQ guide, which answers many of the questions we commonly receive from property owners. Read our full guide HERE.


City and County of Denver Landmark Preservation Commission
Denver's Landmark Preservation Program, a department of the Community Planning and Development Department, designates, preserves and protects structures and districts which reflect the city's architectural and historical value, while promoting the use of these outstanding structures and districts for the education, stimulation and welfare of Denver.  Click HERE to view the website which includes a searchable map of all designated structures and districts, the full text of the landmark ordinance, design guidelines, and tax credit information.


Denver Public Library - Department of Western History and Genealogy
The Department of Western History and Genealogy presently includes 200,000 cataloged books, pamphlets, atlases, maps, and microfilm titles. In addition, it offers 600,000 photographs, 3,700 manuscript archives, and a remarkable collection of Western fine art and prints to researchers across the world.  To view the digital collections of historic photographs and documents, get tips and tools on doing building and neighborhood history research, and access the Creating Communities neighborhood history project, click HERE.  The Department is located on the fifth level of the Central Library, 10 West Fourteenth Avenue Parkway Denver, CO 80204.  The Reference Desk can be reached at 720-865-1821.


History Colorado - State Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation
Click HERE to visit the homepage of the State Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation, which has information on local design guidelines, Preservation Tax Credits, available grants, and lists structures and sites in the National Register of Historic Places and the Colorado State Register of Historic Properties.


National Trust for Historic Preservation
The National Trust for Historic Preservation was created when President Truman signed legislation on October 26, 1949.  Click HERE to learn about National Trust Historic Sites, America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places, Historic Hotels of America, and Historic Artists' Homes & Studios.